Thanks for dropping by! Below are images of a few advertisements from the London Metro. Each image is paired with a set of questions and answers. Happy reading!

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What does this advertisement promote? This advertisement promotes a fruit and vegetable smoothie from a brand named Savsé.

How does this advertisement capture attention? Visually, the product is front and center and both the textual and visual backdrop it is set to possess an interesting flair that establishes a visual motif of fading away. It is particularly effective because right when the words and images become their faintest they give way to the bold, central placement of the product.

Who is the target audience for this advertisement? Health smoothies are by definition a product that target the time-strapped, health-conscious consumer. Both the healthy and the on-the-go lifestyle have cosmopolitan connotations and the cleverness of this ad plays into those traits.

What do the words of this advertisement communicate? Quite simply, that if you’re smart you’ll drink this brand. You’ll get the nutrients you’re after because this brand creates its product the right way.

What do the images of this advertisement communicate? A visual representation of the error that this brand’s product avoids.

How is this advertisement culturally distinct from an advertisement that might be run in the United States? The primary difference here is linguistic. The tagline below the bottle reads “Be Savvy, Drink Savsé.” Savvy is a very British slang term that, while used, is not in the common parlance of many Americans.

How do I feel about this advertisement? I like it a lot. I think it is a very clever representation of a problem with many products marketed ad healthy. It illustrates an awareness of this concern and shrewdly visualizes it while simultaneously positioning the relevant product as the antidote.

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What does this advertisement promote? A protein shot called the V24 Shot.

How does this advertisement capture attention? Well, the first and most obvious tactic is the very fit, attractive model who is baring her midriff. The color choice is also a bold one that is hard to miss.

Who is the target audience for this advertisement? Like the previous advertisement, this is inherently for busy, health-conscious individuals. However, this advertisement adds another dimension. Whereas the other was conceivably about health plain and simple, this advertisement brings physical appearance into the picture. It is for people who want, not just to be healthy, but to be attractive.

What do the words of this advertisement communicate? The giant “think small” is an obvious pun; the shot is small, so drink it and you can be too. This fits with the target audience I discussed above. The text also communicates both the novelty and benefits of the product.

What do the images of this advertisement communicate? Both a demonstration of how small the product is and a presentation of an idealized self.

How is this advertisement culturally distinct from an advertisement that might be run in the United States? Honestly, I don’t detect any important differences. Perhaps this ad, were it run in the U.S., would play up the sex angle a bit more. Apples are very sexualized in U.S. media, so that would not surprise me.

How do I feel about this advertisement? Conflicted. It is obviously done well, visually appealing and effective. But, like all ads featuring idealized selves, it leaves…a bit of an unpleasant aftertaste which suggests that false promises and dreams are being sold.

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What does this advertisement promote? A fashion show but on Balenciaga.

How does this advertisement capture attention? It features, dead center, a striking woman in the middle with a fashion-forward, eye-catching, geometric dress and an attention-grabbing hairstyle.

Who is the target audience for this advertisement? People interested in fashion with the money to afford to attend a fashion show, haute taste, and an appreciation for the art of fashion design.

What do the words of this advertisement communicate? The text is minimal. There are instructions for getting tickets, but past that it is simply the name and a logo. This makes sense as high-fashion brands are typically minimal with text and rely on brand name and icon recognition.

What do the images of this advertisement communicate? That it will be an evening of high fashion.

How is this advertisement culturally distinct from an advertisement that might be run in the United States? I don’t necessarily think there are striking differences; this ad could be found in America. However, I do think it is possible that the image would be slightly more sexualized in an American context, that maybe the emphasis would be placed on sensuality rather than elegance.

How do I feel about this advertisement? I love it. It is clearly high fashion and unrealistic. It is rich, elegant and cosmopolitan without selling false promises because it operates on a level where fashion and art overlap. It is not intended to suggest a lifestyle and it communicates artistic fashion beautifully.

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What does this advertisement promote? Perfectil, a brand of tablets intended to promote healthy skin, hair, and nails.

How does this advertisement capture attention? To be honest, I do not find this advertisement to be particularly attention-grabbing. It relies on its celebrity endorser without doing much to be interesting visually or textually.

Who is the target audience for this advertisement? I think this advertisement has a very broad aim. Women who take care of themselves is about as specific as I think it gets. The advertisement is very generic, which prevents it from catering to a specific niche. It is for the everywoman and it is accessible.

What do the words of this advertisement communicate? That this is the brand Nicole Scherzinger uses, and that it is the best product of its kind on the market. Very simple.

What do the images of this advertisement communicate? That Nicole Scherzinger uses this product and likes it.

How is this advertisement culturally distinct from an advertisement that might be run in the United States? It is very generic, so stylistically it is not very distinct from US advertisements. However, the choice of endorser is very British. Although Nicole Scherzinger is American and has had considerable success in the States, she has never been a very endearing celebrity figure here. People do not talk about her and she no longer really holds relevance in the American music market. In England, however, she has achieved far greater success and had a much more sustained career.

How do I feel about this advertisement? I don’t feel much. I think it is quite generic.

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What does this advertisement promote? While it is not made explicit, I think given the contemporary cultural climate it is clear that this advertisement promotes civic responsibility in a way that draws upon fears of terrorism.

How does this advertisement capture attention? The color palette is definitely an attention-grabbing choice, it has a lot of bright color and strong contrast. It also encourages the viewer to notice something that the individuals in the image are walking past without noticing, which creates a sense of participation.

Who is the target audience for this advertisement? Presumably everyone who is not attempting to conduct an act of terrorism.

What do the words of this advertisement communicate? That it is not unordinary, exceptional or scary to report something suspicious. It gives people instructions on how to complete an act that probably seems quite intimidating to many while encouraging them to not feel weird doing so.

What do the images of this advertisement communicate? That threats are often overlooked by even those who are in the threat’s direct vicinity. This reinforces the importance

How is this advertisement culturally distinct from an advertisement that might be run in the United States? There is an encouraging tone to this ad. It pushes people to complete an action by normalizing it. By contrast, counter-terror advertisements in the US are much more straightforward and commanding. They seek to compel by drawing on a sense of duty and obligation. The frequently used slogan in the American counterparts to this ad, “if you see something, say something,” does, after all, read like a command.

How do I feel about this advertisement? Mostly I feel a sense of curiosity. The approach is so different from American approaches that I want to see information on how they are received by viewers and research on their effectiveness. Does this tone work?

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